Cherry Parfait™ Grandiflora Rose

Terrific blackspot resistance, and extra heat, humidity, and cold tolerance!
2-Quart
Item # 33597
$22.95
Buy 3+ at $19.95
Item is sold out.


Additional Images

Most Roses bloom in waves with rests in between, but Cherry Parfait™ stays colorful all summer long!

This 2003 All-America Rose Selection award winner is a fantastically heavy-blooming, disease-resistant, rugged grandiflora with flowers of red-edged white that actually darken as they mature, instead of bleaching out like older varieties!

Cherry Parfait™ is a nicely rounded little shrub that is literally never out of bloom all summer long, regaling you with armloads of 4-inch flowers from late spring until early fall! The blooms open from lovely pointed buds, arising on 10- to 14-inch stems. You will fall in love with this subtly fragrant, free-flowering beauty! Remove spent blossoms to encourage rebloom.

The leaves of this healthy, 5-foot-tall, 4- to 5-foot-wide shrub are a glossy, deep green and very lush, making Cherry Parfait™ beautiful out of bloom as well as in. And the fact that it's cold hardy, heat tolerant, and disease resistant, means it will be a pure joy for every gardener!

Cherry Parfait™ is great for beds, borders, and the cut garden. Plant in well-drained soil in full sun. Spring pruning is recommended. Old and dead wood should be removed and canes that cross need to be cut back. Gardeners in warmer climates should cut back the remaining canes by about one-third, while those in colder areas will probably want to prune a little more than that. Var: 'MEIsponge' (PP#12,802). Zones 7-10.

Genus Rosa
Variety 'MEIsponge'
ppaf PP#12,802
Zone 7 - 10
BloomStartToEnd Late Spring - Early Fall
Habit Upright
PlantHeight 5 ft
PlantWidth 4 ft - 5 ft
BloomSize 4 in
AdditionalCharacteristics Flower, Fragrance, Long Bloomers, Needs Deadheading
BloomColor Red, White
BudShape Pointed
FoliageColor Dark Green, Glossy
Fragrance Light, Sweet
LightRequirements Full Sun
MoistureRequirements Moist,  well-drained
Resistance Cold Hardy, Heat Tolerant
SoilTolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Beds, Border, Cut Flowers, Ornamental, Outdoor
Restrictions Canada, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands

Bareroot or Container?

World's Finest Roses

Have you browsed through your favorite gardening catalog or website looking for the newest roses to plant in your garden and wondered whether it would be best to choose bareroot roses or those in nursery pots? Or does it matter? If you’re like most rose gardeners, this question has come up at one point or another. And we want to help you find the answer as to what’s the best for you and your garden.


Bareroot Roses

Bareroot

Bareroot roses are an inexpensive and easy option for early-season planting. In fact, late winter is the best time to plant. Bareroot roses meet the highest industry standards. They arrive dormant, which makes them ideal for planting. The roots get to acclimate to native soil, as opposed to the packaged soil. And of course, since they aren't in soil when you get them, there’s no mess to contend with.


Bareroot roses may look dead, with their brown roots and dormant stem, but plants that arrive this way actually have the advantage of being able to focus their energies on strong root development rather than having to support an extensive growth of leaves during planting, which is very stressful.

You can plant your bareroot roses earlier in the growing season as well, since there aren't any leaves to get nipped back by frost. They can typically be planted as early as six weeks before your area’s last frost date in the spring. Since they don’t have to provide water to leaves or flowers, they usually establish quickly.


Container

Container roses should typically be planted in late spring and fall. They’re easy to plant (all you need is a trowel), and they provide instant gratification, as they aren't dormant and will have buds within a few short weeks, if they don’t when they arrive. They’re also perfect for transplanting into decorative containers and make an attractive gift.


Container roses are usually nicely leafed out, and may even have flowers on them, which is a great way for you to know when you purchase them what they’re going to look and smell like. As you can see, there are advantages to both bareroot or container roses, so whichever you decide is the best for your garden, we feel certain you’ll become a lifelong rose lover, if you aren't already!

Overall Rating: 5 Stars
  Average Based on 2 Review(s)
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A bit disappointed
ImJustMe from GA wrote (May 20, 2013):
We bought the Cherry Parfait rose in a container. The plant is doing great. The only issue I have is it doesn't have the same coloring as the picture. It's a lot lighter on the outside edge then in the picture. Still really beautiful though.
Beautiful bloomer!
pkirk646 from FL wrote (May 11, 2013):
Love this beautiful rose!